Well-Child Timeline

Childhood is a time of rapid growth and change. Pediatric well-child visits are an important part of your child’s health from infancy through adolescence.

Each visit includes a complete physical examination, recommended screenings and vaccinations. Each well-child visits assesses your child’s growth and development while identifying underlying conditions that may exist. Height, weight, and other important information are recorded in our electronic medical record. 

Well-child visits provide parents the opportunity to meet with their child’s pediatrician and ask questions. 

The following is the recommended well-child visit schedule and includes milestones, topics discussed, exam details and recommended vaccinations. To make the most of these visits, bring your questions with you to your child’s appointment.

Well-Child Visit Schedule

Congratulations, your baby has arrived! Your baby may see their pediatrician in the hospital within 24 hours after they have been born and again about two days after you have been discharged from the hospital. You and or your partner may be feeling overwhelmed, remember you can always call The Children’s Clinic if you have questions or concerns. Your baby is sleeping between 15-20 hours over 24 hours, though they may only sleep a few hours at a time. Breast or bottle-feed your baby whenever they want and catch little naps whenever possible.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have such as eating, sleeping and temperament.
  • Check your baby’s height and weight.
  • See how well your baby is feeding.
  • Monitor signs of jaundice.
  • Perform one of two heel stick blood tests (called a PKU) to screen for early diagnosis of any rare metabolic disorders.

Recommended immunizations:

  • Hepatitis B (Hep B) – at birth

As you adjust to the new member of your family, remember to sleep when you can and ask for help from friends, family or, The Children’s Clinic. Your baby should have regained the weight they may have lost after their first week. Your baby is ready for supervised tummy time and their umbilical cord will likely have fallen off so you can start giving them baths.

Your baby’s sleep schedule has probably not changed much since birth and it may feel like all they do is feed.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have such as eating, sleeping and temperament.
  • Check your baby’s height, weight and head circumference.
  • Review safe sleeping habits.
  • Perform the second heel stick blood test (called a PKU) to screen for early diagnosis of any rare metabolic disorders.

Recommended immunizations:

  • None

Your baby is more aware of their surroundings during this period and smiling at the sound of your voice. Juggling chores and a new baby is challenging but you are likely sleeping a little more at night. Two-month-old babies typically sleep five to six-hour stretches at night and still take three to four naps a day. If not, don’t worry, sleep will come. Your baby may be crying more now in addition to being more social and that is normal. The fussiness will be less in the upcoming months and sleep will become more regular. Continue tummy time and play with your baby when they are awake.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have such as eating, sleeping and temperament.
  • Check your baby’s height, weight and head circumference.
  • Record your baby’s growth curve.
  • Discuss immunizations.
  • Discuss postpartum depression.

Recommended immunizations:

  • Pentacel – combination of Diphtheria, Tetanus and Pertussis (DTaP), Polio (IPV) and Haemophilus Influenzae Type b (Hib)
  • Pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13)
  • Hepatitis B (Hep B)
  • Rotavirus 

Babies at this age are ready to play and typically grab at objects, laugh and can hold their heads reasonably steady. You might notice your baby babbling away, looking at things in the distance and pushing up on their elbows during tummy time. You may also see a lot of drool. This period of time is when babies start teething and teething toys can come in handy.

Some pediatricians recommend sleep training at this point. Your baby is likely taking three naps a day but maybe waking more during the night. This is because some experts say their active brains don’t allow them to sleep as deeply as before. This phase should only last a few weeks. Your baby’s primary food should be breastmilk or formula. Discuss introducing solid food with your pediatrician.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have such as eating, sleeping and temperament.
  • Check your baby’s height, weight and head circumference.
  • Record your baby’s growth curve.
  • Discuss when to start solid foods.

Recommended immunizations:

  • Pentacel – combination of Diphtheria, Tetanus and Pertussis (DTaP), Polio (IPV) and Haemophilus Influenzae Type b (Hib)
  • Pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13)
  • Rotavirus

Six-month-old babies can typically see across the room, roll over and can sit with help. Babies at this age should never be left alone on a surface they could roll off of. Never leave your baby unattended on a bed or changing table. Babies also love to put everything in their mouths, so be diligent about keeping their area free of choking hazards. If your baby hasn’t started teething, they will likely begin now.

You may have already started feeding your baby solid foods. If not, now is a good time to start slowly introducing one food at a time until you are up to three ounces three times a day. Great choices include banana, sweet potato, brown rice cereal, oatmeal baby cereal, pear, squash and avocado. Infants need additional iron at this age, so incorporate iron-rich foods.

Your six-month-old is likely taking two naps a day and sleeping about 10-12 hours at night. Once great sleepers may regress during this time. This could be because of teething, growth spurts or because they are more mobile and want to move more. Talk to your pediatrician if you have questions about sleep and sleep training.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have such as eating, sleeping and temperament.
  • Check your baby’s height, weight and head circumference.
  • Record your baby’s growth curve.
  • Discuss fluoride supplementation if it isn’t in your district’s water supply.
  • Review home safety and poison checklist.

Recommended immunizations:

  • Pentacel – combination of Diphtheria, Tetanus and Pertussis (DTaP), Polio (IPV) and Haemophilus Influenzae Type b (Hib)
  • Pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13)
  • Rotavirus
  • Hepatitis B (Hep B)

Your nine-month-old is an active little human likely on the verge of crawling or perhaps standing with support. Because they are more mobile, it is more important than ever to keep your eyes on them. Your baby is now recognizing people and may show signs of separation anxiety.  They can also recognize and objects and can sit for extended periods playing with favorite toys. Reading books, playing with blocks, going for walks and imaginary play is important for your baby’s development. Babies at this phase develop the pincer grasp where they use their thumb and index finger to pick up smaller objects, which is great fun for self-feeding. Foods should include whole unprocessed foods from different food groups and in every color of the rainbow.

Your baby will still be taking two naps a day and sleeping about 10-12 hours at night. If your baby isn’t sleeping through the night and you haven’t tried sleep training yet, now might be a good time to talk with your pediatrician about it.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have such as eating, sleeping and temperament.
  • Check your baby’s height, weight and head circumference.
  • Record your baby’s growth curve.
  • Screen for vision and developmental milestones.
  • Screen for anemia, lead and/or tuberculosis (if indicated).

Recommended immunizations:

  • Hepatitis B (Hep B) if needed

Your baby is one year old! Your baby is close to walking, if not doing so already, and saying a few simple words. They are very in tuned with all their senses and likely enjoy textures, colors and music. While your nine-month-old was an adventurous and hearty eater, you one-year-old may be eating a little less and leaning towards favorites. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Keep providing healthy options and let them decide when they are full. Begin the transition from a bottle to a sippy cup if you haven’t already done so.

Their sleep schedule shouldn’t have changed much in the last three months. They will continue with two naps a day and between 10-12 hours of sleep at night.

This is a good time to make sure your baby’s car seat is appropriate for their weight and height.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have such as eating, sleeping and temperament.
  • Check your baby’s height, weight and head circumference.
  • Record your baby’s growth curve.
  • Screen for vision and developmental milestones.
  • Screen for anemia, lead and/or tuberculosis (if indicated).

Recommended immunizations:

  • Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR)
  • Pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13)
  • Varicella (Chickenpox)

Your baby is now a toddler and likely a little explorer. If you haven’t already, be sure to child-proof your home appropriately for this age, covering electrical outlets and putting harmful items such as medicine, cleaning supplies and sharp objects out of reach. Remind grandparents and extended family members to do the same. Toddlers are all over the place when it comes to development. They should have a few words in their vocabulary, be walking or very close to walking and may start throwing tantrums, getting upset when separated from caregivers. When your toddler gets into things they shouldn’t, redirection of attention is a great strategy at this age.

Your toddler is likely down to one nap during the day now. With only one nap and a lot of daily activity, your toddler should be sleeping through the night. Unfortunately, this is when they start developing nightmares that can feel very real to them. Reassure your child that nightmares are not real and soothe them. Talk to your pediatrician if you have questions or concerns.

Continue to provide healthy options during meals and snacks and don’t worry if they don’t eat everything on their plate. To prevent choking, avoid raw carrots, nuts, hard candy hot dogs and grapes.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have such as eating, sleeping and temperament.
  • Check your baby’s height, weight and head circumference.
  • Record your baby’s growth curve.
  • Screen for vision and developmental milestones.
  • Screen for anemia, lead and/or tuberculosis (if indicated).

Recommended immunizations:

  • Pentacel – combination of Diphtheria, Tetanus and Pertussis (DTaP), Polio (IPV) and Haemophilus Influenzae Type b (Hib)
  • Hepatitis A (Hep A)

At this age, your toddler wants both affection and independence.  Tantrums often appear at this age because toddlers have big emotions without the vocabulary to express them. Ensuring your toddler gets adequate sleep, food and avoiding too many overstimulating activities and places, along with a lot of patience, will help you get through most tantrums. Redirection remains a great tool for parents at this stage.

Most toddlers at this age are walking and even running but may still want to be carried when tired. They may be using two-word sentences and enjoy pointing and naming objects. Singing and playing is a big part of your toddler’s routine. Continue reading to them and offer healthy food choices. They will likely say “no” to a lot of foods but continue to add them to their plate. Resist the urge to prepare specific foods just for your toddler.  Their ability to choose what to eat on their plate encourages intuitive eating and can help prevent obesity.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have such as eating, sleeping and temperament.
  • Check your baby’s height, weight and head circumference.
  • Record your baby’s growth curve.
  • Screen for vision and developmental milestones.
  • Screen for anemia, lead and/or tuberculosis (if indicated).

Recommended immunizations:

  • None

Your toddler is two! Your independent toddler wants to choose for themselves whether it is what to do, eat or wear. Offering choices between two good things supports independence. As your toddler grows, so do their emotions. Learning what your child needs to get through a tantrum can be very helpful. For some children, it is redirection, others require a quiet place and some just need to have them. Reward good behavior and be patient when your toddler is challenging.

Routines can help with meals, bedtime and other transitions throughout the day. Limit screen time and continue to read and play with your toddler. While toddlers should eat fruits, vegetables and protein every day, they often don’t. Continue to offer healthy foods and don’t worry when they exert their independence by refusing to eat them. Keep portions small and keep adding them to their plate.

Many toddlers transition from cribs into a big kid bed, requiring a new bedtime routine. Stick to your routine and encourage your toddler to sleep in their bed independently. Most toddlers are still taking one nap during the day. Some children may show an interest in toilet training. If not, don’t push it.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have such as eating, sleeping and temperament.
  • Check your toddler’s height, weight and head circumference.
  • Record your toddler’s growth curve.
  • Screen for vision and developmental milestones.
  • Screen for anemia, lead and/or tuberculosis (if indicated).
  • Discuss toilet training.

Recommended immunizations:

  • Hepatitis A (Hep A)

Your child is talking more than ever with a vocabulary of up to 250 words. Their fine motor skills are improving, and coloring, puzzles and Play-Doh are activities your 30-month-old likely enjoys. They are either starting, ending or in the middle of toilet training. Your child may insist on doing things themselves one minute and the next wanting to be coddled. They may still take daily naps but consider eliminating them if bedtime becomes difficult or too late. Replace naptime with quiet time in their room with a book or music. Some toddlers will only eat a handful of foods. Continue to offer healthy choices at every meal and don’t worry if they don’t finish everything on their plate. Transition from whole milk to skim or 1% milk if you haven’t already done so and offer low-fat dairy. Toddlers should be taking 700mg of calcium daily.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have such as eating, sleeping and temperament.
  • Check your toddler’s height, weight and head circumference.
  • Record your toddler’s growth curve.
  • Screen for vision and developmental milestones.
  • Discuss toilet training.

Recommended immunizations:

  • None

Does your three-year-old talk all the time and ask questions non-stop? Your child is likely running, jumping, climbing and managing stairs with ease. Their vocabulary has probably doubled in the past six months and while their vocabulary has improved, they still may have a hard time with their big emotions. Tantrums can often be worse at three so maintain boundaries and be consistent with your rules and consequences. Your active three-year-old may push back on bedtime, but keeping routines simple, short and consistent will help you navigate bedtime challenges. Your child has a vivid imagination and night terrors often occur during this year. Reassure your child that there is nothing to be afraid of and don’t spend a lot of time dwelling. Often night terrors are more frightening for family members than they are your child. Assuming you are eating a well-balanced diet of fruit, vegetables, protein and whole grains, your three-year-old’s diet should look a lot like yours but in smaller portions. Continue to avoid foods that could be a choking hazard and cut up grapes, hot dogs and raw vegetables in small bite-size portions.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have.
  • Check your child’s height and weight.
  • Record your child’s growth curve.
  • Screen for vision and developmental milestones.
  • Lipid screening (if indicated by family history).

Recommended immunizations:

  • None

Your four-year-old is likely seeking independence while still needing reassurance. Include your child during mealtime conversations and limit screen time to less than two hours a day. Kids at this age have great imaginations and love to play make-believe. They are also very social and enjoy spending time with friends, often wanting to be like them. Encourage play with other peers. They are likely no longer napping unless they are especially tired or ill and should be settled into a bedtime routine including brushing their teeth independently. They should be sleeping about 11 hours a night. Their diet should continue to reflect yours in smaller portions. If your child is learning to ride a bike or riding a scooter, be sure they always wear a properly fitting helmet.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have about car booster seat readiness.
  • Check your child’s height and weight.
  • Record your child’s growth curve.
  • Screen for vision and developmental milestones.
  • Lipid screening (if indicated by family history).

Recommended immunizations:

  • Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR)
  • Varicella (Chickenpox)
  • Diphtheria, Tetanus and Pertussis (DTaP)
  • Polio (IPV)

Your independent five-year-old will likely start kindergarten and their world will expand rapidly. They can tell stories, dress, recognize most letters and enjoy playing make-believe with friends. Ask your child about their day and what they are learning in school. Continue to offer a balanced diet avoiding junk foods, soda and fast foods. A regular bedtime and consistent bedtime routine are best and your five-year-old should sleep about 11 hours a night. You are your child’s most important role model. Teach healthy habits by exercising and planning healthy meals together. Limit screen time and encourage reading. Your child should visit the dentist twice a year. Discuss how to be safe with other adults.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have.
  • Check your child’s height and weight.
  • Record your child’s growth curve.
  • Screen for vision and hearing.
  • Discuss kindergarten readiness.
  • Evaluate speech development.
  • Lipid screening (if indicated if indicated by family history).

Recommended immunizations if not already completed:

  • Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR)
  • Varicella (Chickenpox)
  • Diphtheria, Tetanus and Pertussis (DTaP)
  • Polio (IPV)

By the age of six, your child has learned social skills from school, can write their name and should know left from right. Help your child have a positive outlook on school by showing interest in what they are learning. Help them organize a consistent place to complete homework without the television on. Encourage playing outside to let off steam. Teach your child what to do in case of a fire and practice fire drills at home. Continue offering a balanced diet, including at least five servings of fruits and vegetables. A serving size is one piece of fruit or half a cup of vegetables. Six-year-olds need about eleven hours of sleep a night.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have.
  • Check your child’s height and weight.
  • Record your child’s growth curve.
  • Discuss school performance and development.
  • Discuss exercise and nutrition.
  • Lipid screening (if indicated by family history).

Recommended immunizations if not already completed:

  • Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR)
  • Varicella (Chickenpox)
  • Diphtheria, Tetanus and Pertussis (DTaP)
  • Polio (IPV)

If your child hasn’t started sports or clubs, this may be the time when they show interest. They have the social skills to participate in group activities and they are ready for the additional responsibility participation requires. Ask your child what they are learning in school and encourage them to share their day during family meals. Setting aside time at the end of the day to read with each other will help them discover different types of books.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have.
  • Check your child’s height and weight.
  • Record your child’s growth curve.
  • Screen for anemia, lead and/or tuberculosis (if indicated).
  • Lipid screening (if indicated by family history).

Recommended immunizations:

  • None

Now is a great time to assign chores at home, such as making beds and setting the table. Encourage your child to do things for themselves like making a healthy snack and cleaning up after themselves. Continue to encourage healthy food choices, limited screen time and discussing their day with you and your partner. Some children start puberty early and may show some signs of puberty at this age.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have.
  • Check your child’s height and weight.
  • Record your child’s growth curve.
  • Lipid screening (if indicated by family history).

Recommended immunizations:

  • None

Welcome to the tweens.  Children this age work very hard to fit in and be “normal”. Work on open communication with your child. Show interest in your child’s daily activities and friends. Know where your child is at all times and make sure there is always adult supervision at friend’s homes. Continue to give your child chores and responsibilities and encourage them to help others. Limit the types of video games, YouTube videos, movies and television shows your child watches. Watch television with your child, particularly controversial shows, and discuss them afterward.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have and readiness for removal of the car booster seat.
  • Check your child’s height and weight.
  • Record your child’s growth curve.
  • Lipid screening (if indicated).

Recommended immunizations:

  • None

While still attached to their parents, at this age, children become more independent and enjoy being with friends. Schoolwork requires more critical thinking and comprehension. Continue to keep an open dialogue about what your child is learning at school and their friends. Older children become role models, so keep tabs of who they socialize with. Discuss healthy living practices: sensible food choices, regular physical activity, avoiding alcohol, tobacco or drugs, and maintaining safe habits. Be a role model for your child by staying active, eating a healthy diet and apologizing when you are wrong or have made a mistake. Often kids try to be perfect, so seeing parents admit mistakes sets a healthy example.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have.
  • Check your child’s height and weight.
  • Discuss any concerns you have about car booster seats.
  • Record your child’s growth curve.
  • Lipid screening (if indicated by family history).

Recommended immunizations:

  • None

Many children show signs of puberty at this age. Talk with them about the changes they can expect and be available to answer questions. Friends and peers are very important at this age. Get to know your child’s friends and their families. Praise your child for their work and accomplishments and not just their appearance. Keep an open dialogue about peer pressures around sex, drugs, alcohol and smoking. This period can be a hard transition for children. Continue to monitor your child’s use of mobile devices, computers and social media. The family should continue to share meals without screens and use that time to talk.  

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have.
  • Check your child’s height and weight.
  • Record your child’s growth curve.
  • Complete sports physical forms (if needed).
  • Discuss puberty.
  • Screen for depression.
  • Lipid screening (if indicated by family history).

Recommended immunizations:

  • Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (TdaP)
  • Menactra (Meningococcal ACWY)
  • Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)

This time before they become full-fledged teenagers can be fraught with emotional ups and downs. Because they understand more complex concepts and have a larger vocabulary, you may notice them talking back and pushing boundaries. Continue to talk respectfully to your child to set a good example. While children this age seem like they are pushing their parents away, they still very much need your support and love. If your child hasn’t started puberty yet, don’t worry, it varies from child to child. School has likely become harder and they are expected to manage their homework and time. Give your child space to become an independent learner but keep aware of their school progress. Many schools manage homework online and allow parents access to assignments and grades.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have and readiness for sitting in the car’s front seat.
  • Check your child’s height and weight.
  • Record your child’s growth curve.
  • Complete sports physical forms (if needed).
  • Discuss puberty.
  • Screen for depression.
  • Lipid screening (if indicated by family history).

Recommended immunizations if not already completed:

  • Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (TdaP)
  • Menactra (Meningococcal ACWY)
  • Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)

Officially a teenager, your teen has a lot of emotional and physical changes ahead. Well-child visits are as important now as they were when your child was a baby. Girls especially become hyper concerned about their appearance and weight. Be mindful of how you talk about yourself and encourage health over a number on the scale. Most boys will grow pubic hair and their voices will change. You may notice they prefer to be on their phones texting rather than talking. Find time in the car or during meals to try to draw them out and talk about school and their friends. Some may find the topic of sex uncomfortable, but honest and accurate information is important for your teen. Share your values with them and talk about safe sex and consent.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have.
  • Check your child’s height and weight.
  • Record your child’s growth curve.
  • Complete sports physical forms (if needed).
  • Discuss puberty.
  • Screen for depression.
  • Lipid screening (if indicated by family history).

Recommended immunizations if not already completed:

  • Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (TdaP)
  • Menactra (Meningococcal ACWY)
  • Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)

As your teen enters high school, they are likely fairly independent. Many parents forget the importance of well-child visits once their children enter the teen years. They are just important now as ever. Our well-child exams grow along with your child.  While parents are included during part of the visit, part of the visit will include one-on-one time between the doctor and the patient.  This opportunity for your child to build a trusting relationship with their doctor is important.  It encourages them to take responsibility for their health and wellbeing and offers them time to be open about questions they have about their bodies and health.  Continue to be a good role model for your teen and keep the lines of communication open. It is important to know where they are and with whom. By now, your teen should have more responsibilities at home. Teaching children how to do their laundry, yard work, clean and set aside time for homework will serve them well as they move into high school. Offer privileges based on performance.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have.
  • Check your child’s height and weight.
  • Record your child’s growth curve.
  • Complete sports physical forms (if needed).
  • Screen for depression.
  • Lipid screening (if indicated by family history).

Recommended immunizations if not already completed:

  • Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (TdaP)
  • Menactra (Meningococcal ACWY)
  • Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)

By now your teen should be managing their schoolwork and chores at home. An allowance based on completing chores will offer your teen an opportunity to manage money. Always know where they are and with whom. Talk about your expectations of their behavior outside of the home and the importance of following rules and the law. If you expect your teen o behave more like an adult, it is a good idea to include them in family decisions. Allowing them to have an opinion and listening to them will encourage them to talk with you.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have.
  • Check your child’s height and weight.
  • Record your child’s growth curve.
  • Complete sports physical forms (if needed).
  • Screen for depression.
  • Lipid screening (if indicated by family history).

Recommended immunizations if not already completed:

  • None

Many teens start driving at this age and with the ability to drive comes greater independence and responsibility. Motor vehicle crashes are one of the highest causes of accidental deaths for teens. Many insurance companies offer apps that monitor your teen’s driving. Keep impressing on your teen the importance of following rules and the law. Their world view is shaping through school and their friends. Talk about drugs and alcohol and remember your behavior will set the example for them.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have.
  • Discuss sexual orientation, sexual activity and contraception if relevant.
  • Check your child’s height and weight.
  • Record your child’s growth curve.
  • Complete sports physical forms (if needed).
  • Screen for depression.
  • Lipid screening (if indicated by family history).

Recommended immunizations if not already completed:

  • Menactra (Meningococcal ACWY)

Independent and looking towards the future, your teen is probably gone more than they are home. Just like adults, teens at this age can develop depression. If they seem sad for long periods, contact your pediatrician. Girls level off in their growth at this point, but boys will continue to develop and grow into their early 20s.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have.
  • Check your child’s height and weight.
  • Record your child’s growth curve.
  • Complete sports physical forms (if needed).
  • Screen for depression.
  • Lipid screening (if indicated by family history).

Recommended immunizations if not already completed:

  • Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (TdaP)
  • Menactra (Meningococcal ACWY)
  • Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)
  • Bexsero (Meningococcal Type B)

While many see this age as the threshold to becoming an adult, your child still needs you. Unknowns about the future can be overwhelming for young adults, so being available for questions or just listening is important. Continuing well-child visits through their early 20s will ensure any physical or mental concerns are addressed quickly, setting your child up for success moving forward.

During this visit, your pediatrician will:

  • Discuss any concerns you have.
  • Check your child’s height and weight.
  • Record your child’s growth curve.
  • Complete sports physical forms (if needed).
  • Screen for depression.
  • Lipid screening (if indicated by family history).

Recommended immunizations if not already completed:

  • Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (TdaP)
  • Menactra (Meningococcal ACWY)
  • Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)
  • Bexsero (Meningococcal Type B)